Search
Close this search box.

2020 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Review: A compact crossover of no particular importance

Chris Teague

Chris Teague

The Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross takes its name from the beloved cars.

I wasn’t a big car guy growing up. Some kids can tell you the horsepower and engine and endless stats about every car on the road. Or they’ll notice the difference in taillights between individual model years, or any of a million other nips and tucks that carmakers do to differentiate their cars.

<

These days, it’s my job to know that stuff, but when I was in high school, I didn’t know much — but I knew what a Mitsubishi Eclipse was. As I got ready to write this review, I went back and watched perhaps the most famous 90’s-era Mitsubishi Eclipse you could find: Paul Walker’s bright green ride in “Fast and the Furious”.

2020

The car is more traditional up front than it is in the back.Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

The second-generation Eclipse, built from 1995 to 1999, was the best-known (and best-looking) of all the cars, and became a vehicular icon for my generation in no small part to the role it played in “Fast and the Furious”. Though I remember the car, I’d forgotten how terrible this movie is. The dialogue is cringeworthy, the cars are absurd (how many gears does that thing have?), and the story is outlandish. But it’s still a hoot, and I may end up rewatching the whole series.

But then in 2011, Mitsubishi ended the Eclipse line for good. Or so we thought. Now we have a new one, only the sporty looks and movie-star glamour is long gone. It’s called the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross and it’s… a compact crossover SUV of no particular importance.

That might be a little harsh. It’s actually quite an interesting looking vehicle, which is more than can be said for most crossovers. Though the front isn’t particularly exciting, the rear has more going for it. There’s a dual-window design on the rear tailgate, with a light bar running across the middle. It’s very much a love-it-or-hate-it design, but at least it’s not boring.

There’s a crease running up the doors to the back as well, which looks particularly sharp on the Red Diamond review unit that Mitsubishi sent me for a week. It stickered for $32,720 on the SEL trim, though you can likely negotiate a nice chunk of change off of that at your local Mitsubishi dealer.

2020

The touch screen is okay but the trackpad that is used to navigate it is detrimental.Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

Feature-wise, the Eclipse Cross is well-equipped, with a tiny 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine that makes 148 horsepower. That’s not a ton of power, but for a family crossover it’s plentiful and turns in a combined 25 miles per gallon.

Mine had the $2,100 Touring Package, which kicks in a lovely panoramic sunroof, the ever-important adaptive cruise control and pedestrian detection and auto-braking, a heated steering wheel and heated rear seats, and some other minor additions.

If you look at the feature list, the Eclipse Cross is a solid vehicle. The interior design is a little rougher, with hard plastic everywhere and not-so-luxurious touch points. The trackpad to control the screen is terrible, as are the up/down buttons to control the dual-zone climate control (though the heated seats work excellently).

The infotainment screen could be bigger, and the dash screen needs some polish. The engine gets the job done, but it’s not exactly quiet. It’s a middle-of-the-road crossover. It does what it’s supposed to do. You can get it for a good price and it’s well-equipped.

Share this on your community

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Reddit
WhatsApp
Telegram
Email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest

Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest guides, news, and reviews.

Scroll to Top

Subscribe our newsleter