Say hello to the tiny Nissan Sakura

Chris Teague

Chris Teague

The Sakura is Nissan's newest EV.

It’s no secret that the Japanese get all manner of quirky, cool cars that we don’t see here in the States. Sure, there’s the Nissan Skyline and Mitsubishi Delica van, but tiny vehicles like kei cars and “minivehicles” are popular imports for Americans looking to diversify their drives. Pint-sized kei cars are ripe for electrification, and Nissan did just that with its new Sakura EV, which comes almost a year after the automaker announced it was working with Mitsubishi to develop tiny electric models. It’s one of dozens of new EVs slated to come from the Mitsubishi-Nissan-Renaul Alliance this decade.

Though tiny, the Sakura offers a decent top speed of 80 mph, and its range of around 112 miles could make it an ideal urban runabout for many. That said, there’s little chance the car will come to the United States. Japan’s minivehicles and kei cars are far smaller than anything currently on sale here. For example, the Sakura’s 133.6-inch length makes it almost 18 inches shorter than a Mitsubishi Mirage hatchback, a car that Americans would consider minuscule.

Nissan

The Sakura borrows features from the Nissan Leaf, including its battery.Nissan

Nissan borrowed the Sakura’s 20-kWh battery from the Leaf and says it can be used to provide power for external devices or even power a home for up to a day. The car comes with three driving modes to change the behavior of things like regenerative braking and throttle response, and Nissan says it took further guidance from the Leaf to give the Sakura the quietest cabin in its class.

The Sakura’s upright shape likely helps with headroom, but it certainly doesn’t increase cargo space, as Nissan claims just 107 liters (4 cubic feet) of room. That said, the car features small-item storage spaces for gear like a smartphone or wallet. Buyers can opt for black, beige, or blue-grey interior colors, and an upgrade package is available that brings a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

There are a surprising number of features packed into the minute Nissan’s cabin. A 7-inch digital gauge cluster comes standard, and a 9-inch infotainment touchscreen with navigation. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are also standard. Nissan says the car’s displays are oriented to reduce distraction and keep the driver’s eyes on the road, and ProPilot safety systems are standard, including a new parking assist feature. ProPilot is a stepping stone toward Nissan’s goal of debuting autonomous driving tech by 2030.

Nissan

The Sakura isn’t destined for the U.S. – yet, anyway. Nissan

The Sakura goes on sale in Japan this summer. It’s priced at 1.78 million yen, or around $14,000. The car will be available for purchase online, and Nissan says it will offer video chats and other resources to help buyers with the process. Buyers will be able to opt for a full in-person buying experience, a completely virtual experience, or anything in between.

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